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October 15 is the deadline for individual taxpayers who extended their 2019 tax returns. (The original April 15 filing deadline was extended this year to July 15 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.) If you’re finally done filing last year’s return, you might wonder: Which tax records can you toss once you’re done? Now is a good time to go through old tax records and see what you can discard.

As a result of the current estate tax exemption amount ($11.58 million in 2020), many estates no longer need to be concerned with federal estate tax. Before 2011, a much smaller amount resulted in estate plans attempting to avoid it. Now, because many estates won’t be subject to estate tax, more planning can be devoted to saving income taxes for your heirs.

COVID-19 has changed our lives in many ways, and some of the changes have tax implications. Here is basic information about two common situations.

Monday, September 21, 2020

Back-to-School Tax Breaks on the Books

Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, students are going back to school this fall, either remotely, in-person or under a hybrid schedule. In any event, parents may be eligible for certain tax breaks to help defray the cost of education.

In the COVID-19 era, many parents are hiring nannies and babysitters because their daycare centers and summer camps have closed. This may result in federal "nanny tax" obligations.

COVID-19 is changing the landscape for many schools this fall. But many children and young adults are going back, even if it's just for online learning, and some parents will be facing tuition bills. If your child has been awarded a scholarship, that's cause for celebration! But be aware that there may be tax implications.

Did you recently file your federal tax return and were surprised to find you owed money? You might want to change your withholding so that this doesn’t happen next year. You might even want to do that if you got a big refund. Receiving a tax refund essentially means you’re giving the government an interest-free loan.

As you may have heard, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act allows "qualified" people to take certain "coronavirus-related distributions" from their retirement plans without paying tax.

So how do you qualify? In other words, what's a coronavirus-related distribution?

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